search

Updated February 23, 2012 

Unit 2 Chemical Reactions and Radioactivity


Chapter 4 Resources

Text Page 162

Chapter 4 Graphics Package - text graphics from chapter 4. Each of the image files has the text page number in the file name, so it should be easy to find and identify the image that you need. (Windows Downloading Tip: Right-click on the link and choose "Save Link As...", once the file is on your hard drive, right-click on it and choose "Extract All...")

Text Page 164

Methane Hydrate - this source of methane is found trapped in ice at the bottom of ocean trenches:

  • Fire and Ice - Dr. Ross Chapman's school, the University of Victoria, profiles the researchers work in this field. You can find the original announcement of the 2002 discovery at this link.
  • Methane Hydrates - information about this intriguing potential fuel source, and world locations of the resource.
  • Energy Source of the Future? - Popular Science outlines this promising discovery.

Text Page 164

Mining Methane - - The Mallik 2002 drilling program explored buried deposits of methane, trapped under high pressure and low temperature in tiny ice cages. While we know there's a lot of this material - perhaps as much as the entire world's reserves of traditional fossil fuels - there is also not a lot known about it. In this 9 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, Scott Dallimore, the lead principal investigator with the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Well Program, and a research scientist with the Geological Survey of Canada, says their experiments show that these deposits may indeed be suitable for commercial extraction. (Tip: Download audio files to your hard drive by right-clicking and choosing "Save Link As...")

Text Page 165

Calcium Metal in Water - this includes a short description of the procedure and a 0:58 video clip of the reaction. (RealPlayer required)

Text Page 170

Atomic Theory and the Nucleus - the atom, once thought to be indivisible, is actually made up of sub-atomic particles:

  • Scale Model of a Hydrogen Atom - It can be difficult to believe, but even the smallest atoms - here, hydrogen - are composed primarily of empty space.
  • Atoms Around Us - the Chem4Kids site runs through atomic structure, ions, isotopes, compounds and more, and asks interactive questions along the way. This is a great preview/review for this chapter.
  • The Particle Adventure - a review of atomic theory, with interesting trivia and questions.
  • Matter! - a nice interactive tutorial with good visuals of the atom.

Text Pages 171-172

The Periodic Table - the organization and data of the periodic table:

Text Pages 174-175

The Bohr Model of the Atom - Bohr models of atoms show the nucleus, its contents and the electron shells:

Text Pages 178-180

The Lewis Model of the Atom - using a simplified atomic structure for easy, accurate diagrams of chemical bonding:

  • Lewis Diagrams of the Atom - a simplified version of Bohr models that only show valence electrons and chemical symbols.
  • Lewis Structures - this guide takes you through writing a Lewis structure, as well as ionic and covalent compounds as Lewis diagrams.

Text Page 180

Ozone - this important molecule is our first line of defense against harmful ultraviolet radiation from the sun:

Text Page 180

SciSat/ACE Satellite - - While big NASA and ESA missions get most of the attention, the Canadian space program is making big gains with modest projects. Introduced in this 8 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, the SciSat/ACE satellite is a great example. It's a $42-million-dollar ozone observatory that's studying the Arctic atmosphere to understand the chemical processes contributing to the hole in the ozone layer.

Text Page 182

Nanotechnology - extremely tiny items, often just a few atoms in size, are made for a variety of purposes.

Text Page 182

Atomic Theory and Bonding - try this puzzle to test your knowledge about bonding. (Also available for download )

Text Page 183

Section 4.1 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.

Text Page 184

Ionic compound crystal formation - the positive and negative interactions in an ionic compound produce regular, crystalline solids.

  • Ionic Structure - illustrating and explaining the formation of ionic compounds as crystals.
  • Formation of Ionic Crystal - this simulation shows the positive and negative particles settling into (hopefully) a regular crystalline pattern. If a crystal doesn't form, just tweak the charges and wait for the result.

Text Pages 186-192

Ionic Compound Names and Chemical Formulas - the transfer of electrons between a cation (positive ion) and anion (negative ion).

  • Naming Ionic Compounds - how to name the transfer of electrons between cations (metallic ions, ammonium polyatomic ion) and anions (non-metallic ions, negative polyatomic ions).
  • Formulas to Names - use this quiz page to test how well you can name ionic compounds based on their chemical formulas.
  • Names to Formulas - use this quiz page to test how well you can write chemical formulas of ionic compounds based on their name.
  • Names and Formulas - this java-based quiz is simple, but provides lots of practice naming ionic compounds.
  • Ionic Nomenclature - more practice with the names and formulas of ionic compounds.

Text Pages 193-196

Covalent Compound Names and Chemical Formulas - the sharing of electrons between non-metals in a variety of proportions.

Text Page 197

Practical Uses of Various Compounds - sometimes we forget; these formulas and names are attached to some interesting chemicals.

Text Pages 198-199

Flame Test - ionic compounds burn in very distinct colours, all at once.

Text Page 200

Electronegativity - electrons are shifted around in molecules, causing parts to become polar (slightly more negative or positive).

Text Page 200

Names and Formulas - this puzzle reviews naming of compounds. (Also available for download )

Text Page 201

Section 4.2 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.

Text Page 202

Early Earth Air - - Titan, one of Saturn's moons, has an atmosphere of methane and nitrogen. Sunlight breaks this atmosphere down into complex hydrocarbons -- basically smog particles -- which rain down on the surface. If all this reminds you of Earth, then you live in Los Angeles, or your memories are of a time about 3 billion years ago. In this 8 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, a research team from the University of Colorado shows that the early Earth's atmosphere could well have been much like Titan's, and the pollution-like chemicals created from the methane could have been a tasty treat for early microbial life.

Text Page 214

Chemical Equations - this puzzle reviews chemical equations - give it a try. (Also available for download )

Text Page 202

Copper and Nitric Acid - these two react very vigorously.

Text Page 202

Chemical Equations - each of these methods helps to explain and examine the atoms involved in chemical change.

  • Chemistry Word Equations - a simple set of examples illustrating how to get from a word equation to a balanced chemical equation.
  • Writing Word Equations - once the word equation is written, the remaining steps to obtain a balanced reaction are covered as well.

Text Page 204

Ignite Hydrogen in a Balloon - but what if the balloon was really big?

Text Pages 203-205

Mass Changes in Chemical Reactions - although there are chemical changes, and therefore different materials produced, the overall mass in the system stays the same.

Text Pages 205

Law of Conservation of Mass Experiment - NaOH, CuSO4, NH4OH and Na2CO3 react. Is the mass of the products after the reaction the same as the reactants before you begin?

Text Page 206

Balancing Chemical Equations - since mass is equal before and after a chemical change, it makes sense that the numbers of atoms should also be the same before and after.

Text Page 211

Early Models of Chemical Compounds - amazing ideas sprang from the minds of the early chemists.

Text Page 214

Antoine and Marie-Anne Lavoisier - these early brilliant chemists were among the first to grasp the concept of conservation of mass.

Text Page 215

Section 4.3 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.



Chapter 5 Resources

Text Page 218

Chapter 5 Graphics Package - text graphics from chapter 5. Each of the image files has the text page number in the file name, so it should be easy to find and identify the image that you need. (Windows Downloading Tip: Right-click on the link and choose "Save Link As...", once the file is on your hard drive, right-click on it and choose "Extract All...")

Text Page 218

Pigments - the chemistry of the colours in our world:

Text Page 220

The Tailless Whip Scorpion - which you may recognize from the Harry Potter movies as the victim of a cruciatus curse.

Text Page 221

Acids and Bases are Everywhere - information on acids, bases and the pH scale, the level of acidity is measured using this scale of 0 -14.

Text Page 222

Number Scales - there are many different scales used to measure and compare qualities in science:

  • Geology and Earth Sciences - the geologic time scale (1 000 000 years per tick), and the Richter scale (a magnitude 6 earthquake has a magnitude 100 times greater than a magnitude 4 quake). A normal-sized globe, often found in a classroom, has a scale where 1 cm = 600 km. Tornado's are measured on the Fujita scale, where an F0 tornado breaks branches off trees, and an F4 lifts cars off the ground.
  • Physical Sciences: Decibels - the decibel (dB) scale measure the intensity of sound (each increase of 10 dB = 10X louder). A rock concert or jet engine (120 dB) is 1 millions times louder than a normal conversation (60 dB).
  • Physical Sciences: Light Years - In space, distances are so vast that light years are used. The distance between Earth and the sun is 1 micro-light year, while proxima centauri, the second-closest star to Earth, is 4 light years away.

Text Page 221

pH Indicators - a variety of devices, and chemicals, can be used to determine pH:

  • Litmus Paper - one the simplest and best known methods of determining if a solution is acidic or basic.
  • Chemical Indicators - a wide range of chemicals, measuring a wide range of pH values.
  • pH Meter - a pH meter measures the precise amount of electricity that a solution can conduct, and displays the corresponding pH on a scale or digital screen

Text Page 222

Oceans and CO2 - - Carbon dioxide emissions from industrial smokestacks and tailpipes doesn't just stay in the atmosphere. The CO2 is also absorbed into the world’s oceans, essentially acidifying the water. And that acid mix isn’t a healthy one for marine organisms. In this 8 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, Dr. Victoria Fabry of California State University at San Marcos spells out the danger our oceans face.

Text Page 222

Carbon Sunk In The Ocean - - Dr. Peter Brewer, Senior Scientist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, has been doing experiments on what happens to concentrated carbon dioxide when you put it deep underwater. In this 8 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, he describes experiments which might help to prove the practicality of dumping fossil fuel generated CO2 in the deep ocean.

Text Page 225

Naming Acids - the name of the compound it comes from is key to naming an acid.

Text Page 225

Earth's Evil Twin - - 4.5 billion years ago, the Earth and Venus formed as virtual twins. Unfortunately, while Earth went on to life and glory, Venus went wrong. So it's now a world of crushing pressure, a runaway greenhouse effect, and sulfuric acid clouds. This 12 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast describes the results from the European Space Agency's Venus Express mission that were recently released and they go some way toward explaining how Venus ended up as it did.

Text Pages 227

pH Activities - there are many interesting, fun activities you can do with acids and bases, but always use proper safety precautions:

Text Page 227

Bases - many bases have a chemical formula that ends with OH (but not all do)

Text Page 228

Acids, Bases and the Production of Ions - acids and bases are what they are because of the ions they produce when dissolved in solution:

Text Page 228

Insect Stings - Want to take the "sting" out of that insect bite? Use chemistry to help make your decision:

  • Insect Stings - learn more about what you wish you knew less about.
  • Formic Acid - named for the Latin word for ant, formica, this acid is also found in stinging nettles.

Text Page 229

Properties of Acids and Bases - take this 20-question quiz to test your knowledge of the properties of acids and bases.

Text Page 229

Lactic Acid - it turns out that lactic acid is actually used for added energy boosts for muscles, but it does increase the pH in the muscles as it is used.

Text Page 232

Acid Oceans - although it sounds good at first - oceans absorbing some of the excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere - there is also more acid produced, dropping the pH of the ocean and changing many ocean ecosystems:

Text Page 232

Calcium in the Cambrian - - 530 million years ago, in an event known as the Cambrian explosion, life went from simple and small to large and complex, and the animals that are ancestors to most creatures on earth suddenly appeared. In this 9 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, Dr. Tim Lowenstein, a professor of Geology at Binghamton University in New York State, found that the explosion of life corresponded to an increase in calcium in the sea. Animals used this extra calcium to build hard shells and structures that allowed them to get larger, and become more resistant to predators.

Text Page 232

Acids and Bases - test your acid and base knowledge with this puzzle. (Also available for download )

Text Page 233

Section 5.1 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.

Text Page 234

Salt - salt is a very complex compound, with a rich history:

  • Salt Institute - discover more about salt in today's world, including the relationship between salt and the prevention of goiter.

Text Page 235

Three Salts - in our context, salts refer to the compounds formed during the reaction of an acid and a base:

Text Page 236

Acid-Base Neutralization - many household products, and everyday chemical reaction, rely on acid-base neutralization:

Text Page 237

Acid Rain - the oxides that produce acid rain, the effects of acid rain, and method to decrease oxide effects.

Text Page 237

Aluminum Amperage - - Cars and laptops of the future may run on -- aluminum. In this 8 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, we learn that aluminum normally reacts with water to form a kind of rust-like oxide. On most aluminum metal, this oxide forms an impermeable surface coating, protecting the rest of the aluminum from reacting. But Dr. Tom Troczynski, a professor of Ceramics and Dr. Ashok Chaklader, professor emeritus in the department of Materials Engineering at the University of British Columbia, have found that if you can remove this coating and expose the aluminum to water and salt, in just the right way, you release hydrogen. That hydrogen can be used to power a fuel cell for portable electronics or even for a car.

Text Page 237

Antimony: The New Lead - - Attempts to lower lead levels in the atmosphere have been very successful in the last few decades. But now, there's another metal out there, that has some scientists worried. It's antimony, a naturally occurring mineral, that's used in many different kinds of plastics. In this 8 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, Dr. Bill Shotyk, from the University of Heidelberg, has been measuring antimony levels in the Arctic. He's found that, while lead levels have been dropping, antimony levels are on the rise. He's also finding antimony oxide in water that has leached out of plastic bottles.

Text Page 238

Acids and Metals - the reaction of metals and acids was one of the original methods of classifying acidic solutions:

Text Pages 238

Reaction of Metals with Acid - a complete virtual lab, taking you step-by-step through this topic.

Text Page 239

Acids and Carbonates - the reaction of metals and acids was one of the original methods of classifying acidic solutions:

Text Pages 239

Acids and Carbonates - the reaction that threatens natural sources of carbonate via the production of acid precipitation:

Text Page 239

Protecting and Preserving Outdoor Art - acid precipitation threatens limestone statues and any architecture containing carbonates:

Text Page 239

Concrete Pyramids - - In this 10 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, Dr. Michel Barsoum, a professor of Materials Science and Engineering at Drexel University in Philadelphia, thinks the pyramids, or at least part of them, were made of concrete. Not modern concrete, but a simpler kind of cement that nevertheless seems to have survived the eons, and is practically indistinguishable from limestone.

Text Page 242

Cueva de los Cristales - giant crystals in a northern Mexican cave:

Text Page 242

Cueva de los Cristales - stunning video of these massive crystals (4:56).

Text Page 243

Section 5.2 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.

Text Page 243

Smelting - refining mineral deposits can have many environmental concerns:

  • Smelting Lead - this site provides a very complete review of the lead smelting process.
  • Simply Zinc - background on zinc and where it comes from.
  • Lead and Zinc Mining - these two metals are often found together when mining.

Text Page 244

Organic Chemistry - the study of compounds that contain carbon:

Text Page 244

Carbon Producing Mammal - - A remarkable new animal was discovered in Viet Nam recently by Dr. Alexander McKenzie, a biologist at the Woody Hole Terragraphic Institute. The small mammal seems to be able to consume most kinds of organic matter, and somehow combines it with carbon dioxide from the air, to produce fecal pellets of limestone. Find out more in this 7 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast.

Text Page 245

Organic Compounds - organic compounds form predictable structures:

Text Page 246

Hydrocarbons - organic compounds that contain only carbon and hydrogen atoms:

Text Page 246

Solar Gas - - Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, have developed a way to make gasoline out of solar energy, doing in moments what nature does over eons. In this 10 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, these researchers say that by focusing solar heat, they can crack carbon dioxide to create hydrocarbons, thus potentially providing a carbon-neutral way to produce hydrocarbon fuels. In effect, they are reversing combustion and turning carbon dioxide back into fuel.

Text Page 247

Introducing Alcohols - an introductory, but in-depth, look at alcohols.

Text Page 247

High Proof Hydrogen - - Hydrogen might be the fuel of the future, except that we don't have a source for it and we don't know how to carry it around. In this 9 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, Dr. Lanny Schmidt, a professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota, and his colleagues have found a way to solve part of the problem. They've constructed a small device known as a reformer that can convert ordinary ethanol - alcohol - into hydrogen to be used in a fuel cell. Since ethanol can be a green fuel, and is easily transported, this could be part of the future hydrogen economy.

Text Page 248

The Organic Chemistry of Plastics - organic solvents that contain only carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms:

  • How Plastics Work - everything from the history of plastics to how they are made and what they are composed of.
  • Macrogalleria - a large website with pretty much everything you could possible want to know about polymers.

Text Page 248

Groups of Organic Compounds - some ideas for organic compounds:

Text Page 250

Research and Development Chemist: Hair Care - the chemistry of this industry is both complicated and lucrative:

Text Page 250

Organic Compounds - this puzzle reviews naming of compounds. (Also available for download )

Text Page 251

Section 5.3 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.



Chapter 6 Resources

Text Page 254

Chapter 6 Graphics Package - text graphics from chapter 6. Each of the image files has the text page number in the file name, so it should be easy to find and identify the image that you need. (Windows Downloading Tip: Right-click on the link and choose "Save Link As...", once the file is on your hard drive, right-click on it and choose "Extract All...")

Text Page 256

The Six Types of Chemical Reaction - a quick review of each of the six types of reaction.

Text Pages 256-265

Chemical Reactions of Different Types - there are many kinds of reactions, see many examples here!

Text Page 259

Moon Oxygen - - The moon may have no air, but it does have plenty of oxygen. The lunar soil, or regolith, is largely made of oxides like silicon dioxide, calcium oxide and iron oxide. In this 8 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, Dr. Eric Cardiff, from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is developing a technique to use solar energy to extract the oxygen for use as breathable air and as rocket fuel. (Tip: Download audio files to your hard drive by right-clicking and choosing "Save Link As...")

Text Page 260

Kangaroo Burps - - Kangaroos and cows have a lot more in common than you might think. Namely, they're both grazers and both depend on microbes in their digestive tract to help them breakdown their high-fibre diet. The difference is that cows produce high amounts of the greenhouse gas, methane, in the process. Kangaroos, on the other hand, produce almost none. In this 8 minute audio Quirks and Quarks broadcast, Dr. Athol Klieve, a researcher with the Department of Primary Industries & Fisheries in Queensland, Australia, is studying the gut bacteria of certain species of kangaroo, in the hope that they can be transfered into the digestive system of cattle; and, in doing so, significantly cut back the amount of greenhouse gas they produce.

Text Pages 266-267

Test your knowledge of chemical reactions - these links will use a variety of interactive methods to test your chemical reaction knowledge:

Text Page 267

Na3N Synthesized from its Elements - it took many years to discover how to synthesize this elusive compound.

Text Page 270

Stainless Steel - a mixture of iron and carbon, steel is made impervious to rust (iron oxide) by using chromium oxide:

Text Page 270

Types of Chemical Reactions - this puzzle reviews chemical reaction types. (Also available for download )

Text Page 271

Section 6.1 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.

Text Page 272

Rates of Reaction - how quickly the products are formed, and the reactants are used up, can be altered in a number of ways:

Text Page 272

Diamonds - the unique composition and process that produce on the hardest, most valuable materials on Earth:

Text Page 280

Rate of Chemical Reactions - test your knowledge of factors affecting chemical reaction rates. (Also available for download )

Text Page 274

Temperature and Reaction Rate - glowsticks and water at different temperatures, including an interactive movie.

Text Page 275

Elephant Toothpaste and Reaction Rate - this popular demo can really illustrate how concentration effects reaction rate.

Text Page 276

Making Nylon - building a polymer chain one link at a time.

Text Pages 276-277

Catalysts and Reaction Rate - sometimes, the presence of a chemical catalyst speeds up a reaction :

  • Catalysts and Inhibitors - use these to control the rate of reaction without dangerous pressures, concentrations or temperature changes.
  • Catalytic Converters - in vehicles, this device uses catalysts to clean the exhaust gases.

Text Page 277

Chemical Reactions and Food Preservation - a great example of when slow reaction rates are desired:

Text Page 280

Reaction Rate in Air bags - have you ever wondered how a safety airbag in your car works?:

Text Pages 280

Reaction Rate in Airbags - simulate an inflating airbag deployment:

Text Page 281

Section 6.2 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.



Chapter 7 Resources

Text Page 284

Chapter 7 Graphics Package - text graphics from chapter 7. Each of the image files has the text page number in the file name, so it should be easy to find and identify the image that you need. (Windows Downloading Tip: Right-click on the link and choose "Save Link As...", once the file is on your hard drive, right-click on it and choose "Extract All...")

Text Page 284

Radioactivity in Medicine - radioactive elements can be used for many functions in medicine:

Text Page 286

Background Radiation - natural background radiation is emitted from natural sources all around us:

Text Page 287

Radiation and the Electromagnetic Spectrum - high energy waves and particles make up everything from radio waves to gamma rays.

Text Pages 287

Amateur Radiation Detection and Experimentation Page - use a Geiger-Müller counter to determine radiation levels in your environment.

Text Page 288

Searching for Invisible Rays - the history of radiation discoveries:

Text Pages 289-291

Isotopes and Mass Number - isotopes of an element have the same number of protons, but different numbers of neutrons:

Text Pages 287

Isotopes of Pennies - this activity leads students through steps to introduce the concept of isotopes.

Text Page 293

Radioactive Decay and Radioisotopes - radioactive isotopes of elements decay (break down) into more stable atoms at a very predictable rate:

Text Pages 294-297

Three Types of Radiation - most radioisotopes decay by emitting alpha particles, beta particles or gamma rays:

Text Page 299

Radon - this hazardous radioactive element is found naturally in British Columbia:

  • RADON - Why the Concern? - from the BC Centre of Disease Control, information about radon.
  • Radon - a very informative collection of information from the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Text Page 300

Forensic Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry Conference - a large collection of materials from various presenters at a conference.

Text Page 300

Radioactive Decay - a puzzle all about radioactive decay. (Also available for download )

Text Page 301

Section 7.1 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.

Text Page 302

The Ancient Bristlecone Pine - these trees are so old that both ring-counting and carbon dating can be used to determine their ages!

Text Page 304

Carbon Dating - by measuring amounts of radioisotopes like carbon-14 and their stable products, ages of very old objects can be determined:

Text Pages 304

Where Has All the Carbon Gone? - a complex activity designed to immerse students in a mystery that may be solved by carbon dating.

Text Pages 304-305

Half-Life and the Decay Curve - this concept can be difficult to grasp, so try these pages for assistance:

Text Pages 305

Carbon Dating, Half-Life and the Decay Curve - these activities will help you practice your dating skills.

  • Radiocarbon Dating - this multi-step activity presents many interactive challenges (many quite difficult) about radioactive dating.
  • Half Life Graphs: Decay Curves - every decay curve looks the same, as only the length of the half life changes.

Text Page 307

Common Isotope Pairs - when determining age by radioactive dating, scientists look at the ratio of parent isotope to daughter isotope:

Text Page 309

Uses for Radioisotopes - other than radiometric dating, radioisotopes have many uses:

Text Page 311

Section 7.2 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.

Text Page 313

Nuclear Fission - by splitting atoms, huge amounts of energy are released:

Text Page 315

Albert Einstein and E=mc2 - reading this summary makes you appreciate what a brilliant discovery this formula actually is.

Text Page 316

Nuclear Fission - uranium-235 and a slow neutron combine to release massive energy.

Text Page 318

Chain Reactions - how to write nuclear reactions in the same framework as chemical reactions:

Text Page 318

CANDU Reactors - how to write nuclear reactions in the same framework as chemical reactions:

Text Page 320

Nuclear Fusion - how to write nuclear reactions in the same framework as chemical reactions:

Text Page 321

Inertial Confinement Fusion - how to write nuclear reactions in the same framework as chemical reactions:

Text Page 322

Modelling Chain Reactions - chain reactions are interesting, but modeling them is even more fun!

Text Page 323

Evaluating Nuclear Waste Storage - nuclear power may play an important role in Canada's future; what are the hazards produced by reactors?

Text Page 324

Pursuing the Dream of Fusion Power - huge amounts of energy using abundant resources producing no dangerous waste products:

Text Page 324

Nuclear Reactions - this puzzle reviews the interesting topic of nuclear reactions. (Also available for download )

Text Page 325

Section 7.3 Quiz - need more practice? Try this online quiz.

Text Page 331

Chemicals Among Us - controversies abound where the worlds of chemistry, environmentalism, health and consumerism meet:

Bisphenol-A - can a component found in many plastics be causing lower fertility rates?

DDT - this controversial chemical saves lives by killing mosquitoes carrying malaria, but may also cause problems through many food chains.

  • DDT - from the Environmental Protection Agency in the US.
  • DDT - from Duke University.

Phthalates - used in many plastic food storage containers and wraps, these chemicals are easily absorbed when heated.

PBDEs - these chemicals are used to prevent the burning of many product, but may also cause health problems.

Copyright 2012 - McGraw-Hill Ryerson

 

[ Home ] Contact ] Teacher's Corner ] Order ] F.A.Q. ] [Privacy] [Copyright] [Terms of Use]